An updated 2022 catalogue is currently in preparation. Following are basic program features:

General Program Overview

Coursework consists of 702 clock hours (39 courses of 18 clock hours each) of instruction in psychoanalysis as follows:

  • 23 courses in psychoanalytic theory
    • 17 courses in foundations of psychoanalytic theory, history, and theory of practice
    • 4 courses in integration of psychoanalysis and spirituality
    • 2 elective courses
  • 8 terms of Clinical Case Seminar, a technique and practice sequence
  • 8 terms of Clinical Training Conference, a series of integrative presentations on the theory and practice of psychoanalysis

Personal psychoanalysis consists of a minimum of 300 clock hours of personal psychoanalysis:

  • Blanton-Peale requires personal psychoanalysis at least twice weekly with a Certified Psychoanalyst to begin by the end of the first semester of attendance and continuing the duration of the training. Minimum requirement: 300 clock hours.

Supervised Analysis consists of a minimum of 150 clock hours of supervision:

  • A minimum of 150 clock hours of the student’s clinical work with psychoanalytic cases with a minimum of 3 different supervisors through the course of the training. Once a Resident begins the clinical experience portion of the training the Resident must remain in supervision until program completion.
    • At least 50 clock hours of supervision with one supervisor focused on one case
    • At least 100 clock hours with two other supervisors focused on other clinical cases

Clinical Experience requires Completion of at least 1000 face to face clock hours in the practice of psychoanalysis

  • Clinical experience under supervision begins once a Resident has been in attendance for one full year, has achieved a minimum of 50 sessions of personal psychoanalysis, and has completed at least 6 courses, including CCSa (Psychoanalytic Ethics) and CCSb (Introduction to Psychoanalytic Clinical Practice)

Curriculum

Phase I
PS 101: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis I This is the first term of a two term Phase I course to be taken as the Resident is about ready to begin clinical work under supervision. The course begins with a discussion of diagnosis, its meaning and utility, as well as an introduction to the DSM, ICD and PDM diagnostic systems.
Course material emphasizes psychoanalytic conceptualizations of anxiety, hysteria, obsession, depression, and other neurotic conditions, and links these diagnoses to appropriate treatment techniques. A discussion of trauma is included as well. Prerequisites: Freud I and II
PS 102: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis II This is the second term of a two term Phase I course to be taken as the Resident is beginning to work with patients under supervision. Course material emphasizes psychoanalytic conceptualizations of more severe pathologies such as narcissism, defects of the self, and borderline and psychotic conditions. The course includes a discussion of character configurations and treatment mechanisms. A discussion of trauma is incorporated throughout both terms of this course. Prerequisite: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis I
PS 105: Freud I: Introduction to Psychoanalytic Theory and Process This course is the first of a two-term course that will introduce students to basic concepts of psychoanalysis as conceptualized by its founder Sigmund Freud. Through an overview of Freud’s writings from 1893 to 1922, students develop familiarity with essential psychoanalytic thinking and concepts, such as Freud’s initial formulations of hysteria, narcissism, drive and instinct, repression, and the topographical theory. Reference is made to contemporary formulations of these primary concepts.
PS 106: Freud II: Introduction to Psychoanalytic Theory and Process This course is the second of a two-term course that introduces students to basic concepts of psychoanalysis as conceptualized by its founder Sigmund Freud. Through an overview of Freud’s writings from 1922 to 1940, students develop familiarity with essential psychoanalytic concepts and thinking, such as the structural theory, Freud’s elaboration of clinical theory through his technique papers and case studies, and his understanding of social phenomena. Reference is made to contemporary formulations of these primary concepts. Prerequisite: Freud I
PS 107: Human Growth and Development I This two-term course will examine selected bio/psycho/social issues in human growth and
development from a psychoanalytic perspective. The course this term is organized around different theoretical viewpoints on human development and will focus on birth through adolescence. Throughout both terms, attention is paid to the ways in which human development is influenced by the reciprocal interaction of primary caregiver, family, and ever-widening social environments.
PS 108: Human Growth and Development II The second term of this two-term course will examine selected bio/psycho/social issues in human growth and development over the life span and the psychoanalytic theories that deal with them. Growth and Development II will cover the developmental concepts of several more psychoanalytic theorists and then cover the period of adolescence through death. Concepts from the traditional models, feminist theory, cultural contexts and spiritual development will be considered. We will continue to consider the ways in which human development is influenced by the reciprocal interaction of the family and ever-widening social environments.
Prerequisite: Growth and Development I
PS 109 Use of Dreams in Psychoanalysis This seminar provides an intensive study of Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams. Situating The Interpretation of Dreams in its historical context, and against the background of texts that help us to understand what is specific about the book’s
breakthrough, we will appreciate why the initial topic of psychoanalytic research was not sexuality, nor the ego, but memory, and why Freud’s radically new theoretical integrations and innovative technical procedures gave rise to psychoanalysis as a new form of science and of therapeutic practice. Using this book and updating it where appropriate, this course will focus on techniques of dream interpretation and on the topographic theory of dream construction as conceptualized in the text.
To be taken at the end of Phase I courses, once Residents have begun to work with patients
PS 110: Jung I: The Symbolic Nature of the Psyche This is the first of a two-part course designed to introduce the historical context of the development of depth psychology, the main theoretical concepts advanced by Jung, and the application in clinical practice of symbolic thinking in the treatment process. Throughout the two terms we will examine the work not only of contemporary Jungians, but we will also explore intersections and divergences with other psychoanalytic models, most particularly neo-Freudian, object relations and relational schools. In the first semester we cover the historical setting of Jung’s contributions to psychoanalysis and introduce some of his theoretical concepts. The close alliance and ultimate rupture of the relationship with Freud played a pivotal role in the shaping of contemporary psychoanalysis and we will examine the path of this relationship, the spark of initial shared interest in the unconscious, the emergence of differences and the final break between the two. The goal here is to understand the similarities and differences, be able to articulate them and move toward the capacity to employ both Freud and Jung’s theories in clinical practice. This first term of these two parts is weighted toward building a deep understanding of the historical development of depth psychology and introducing Jung’s theoretical concepts and their application in clinical practice.
Prerequisite: Freud I and II
PS 111: Jung II: The Symbolic Nature of the Psyche II This second section of the Intro to Jung will build on the first semester. It has two main goals: 1) to give an overview of the major aspects of Jungian theory regarding the structure and dynamics of the psyche and how those theoretical concepts are applied in clinical practice, and 2) to gain a practical understanding of Jungian symbolic thinking, a mythic-poetic approach to clinical listening and interpretation that enables one to add a Jungian approach to the individual’s clinical skillset. We will pay particular attention to dream work, the role of individuation in the analytic process, and interpretation of symbols and archetypes.
Prerequisite: Jung I
Clinical Case Seminar (CCSa)
Professional Ethics for Psychoanalysis
In this course, Residents will work toward a knowledge and understanding of what constitutes ethical and legal psychoanalytic practice. We’ll look at the issues that psychoanalysts can encounter as well as situations they can cause or contribute to, and what is the ethical way for an analyst to resolve these situations.
Clinical Case Seminar (CCSb) Introduction to Psychoanalytic Clinical Practice This course introduces Residents to basic psychoanalytic clinical concepts and practices—the frame, defense, resistance, transference and countertransference, unconscious process—in preparation to begin working with patients under supervision in the next semester. Students will be introduced to theoretical, practical and spiritual underpinnings of psychoanalytic clinical work from classical, object relations, developmental, interpersonal and Jungian perspectives.

Course material will address first engagement with a patient and beginning a treatment. Blanton-Peale clinic procedures will be discussed.

Phase II
PS 203 Object Relations Theory In this course we will examine the emergence and the history of what is known as “object
relations theory” in psychoanalysis. Beginning with Freud, we will see how object-relatedness has always been of central importance to psychoanalytic thinking, despite contemporary debates over whether psychoanalysis is a “one person” or “two person” (or “three person”) psychology. We will examine how our relationships to external and internal objects has been understood by psychoanalysis, and we will ask questions about how psychoanalysis potentially transforms what we mean by an
external and internal object.
Prerequisite: Freud I and II
PS 207 Sociocultural Influence on Growth and Psychopathology This class will consider the ways that we approach Culture and Psychopathology, both theoretically and clinically. First, we will think about what culture is and what it does, and then how it can influence psychopathology and the expression of different symptoms. Then, we will look at how earlier theorists tried to conceptualize the relationship between culture and the individual, and how we might think about this today. We will consider the question of universal development and whether we can think about the unconscious as separate from culture, or precultural, and what that would mean. We will consider the various discourses and practices that are part of culture, and how they may appear in the consulting room to both facilitate and hinder treatment, and lead to transference and countertransference enactments. As clinicians become more aware of difference, we ask how we can be sure when this is an important part of the treatment and its development. We will also ask how this might challenge our classical ideas of neutrality, and how the clinical encounter is affected when we embody cultural difference and power relations in the treatment process.
Prerequisite: Working with Patients
PS 208 Psychoanalytic Research Methodology In this course, students will explore and become familiar with empirical methods for research in psychoanalysis and distinguish these methods from other, non-empirical methods sometimes presented as psychoanalytic research. Students will examine what research is and what is its purpose and method. The evidence-based controversy in mental health practice will be addressed, as well as counter arguments to empirical methods for evaluating and studying mental health phenomena. Major domains of psychoanalytic research will be defined and explored: outcome, process, developmental, and conceptual research. Arguments will be made for psychoanalysts’ familiarity with empirical research methodology to be equipped to read and evaluate the validity of research findings in mental health in general and psychoanalysis in particular, and to participate in broader discussions about this research in their professional lives.
Prerequisite: Working with Patients
PS 209: Human Sexuality in Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice This seminar focuses on gender and sexuality as two of the many threads woven into the tapestry of the human subjective experience and its relational dimensions. We explore the complexities of gender and sexuality, and their evolving conceptions, through (1) Psychoanalysis, from the classical position to the elaborations and revisions of feminist, relational, and queer practitioners, and (2) Contemporary discourses in the areas of gender, sexuality, and cross-cultural studies. In addition, the seminar will explicitly address how power is implicated in the theorizing about gender and sexuality
Clinical Case Seminar (CCS c thru f) Residents at similar levels of training and experience meet together with an instructor to discuss their clinical work focusing each semester on a different foundational psychoanalytic theoretical concept:
CCS c: Analysis of Defense
CCS d: Analysis of Resistance
CCS e: Transference/Countertransference with emphasis on Transference
CCS f: Transference/Countertransference with emphasis on Countertransference
Prerequisite: Working with patients under supervision
Phase III
PS 301 Advanced Psychoanalytic Theory and Process This course provides an introductory overview of the diagnostic and treatment features of more severe, non-neurotic pathologies—borderline and psychotic conditions, as well as pre-oedipal and narcissistic personality configurations. Particular attention will be paid to the specific manifestations of defense, resistance, transference and countertransference in these situations. Discussion will ensue about the adjustments to technique necessary to work with these disorders. Reference to psychosomatic and addictive situations will be made.
Prerequisite: Advancement to Training Phase III
PS 303 Contemporary Psychoanalytic Thought I This is the first of a two-part course covering the contemporary theoretical perspectives in today’s mainstream of psychoanalysis. The course provides an introduction and overview of the Self Psychological, Interpersonal, Intersubjective, Relational, and Constructivist approaches. These theories are discussed not only theoretically, but also in their clinical manifestations and spiritual implications
Prerequisite: PS 301, Advanced Psychoanalytic Theory and Process
PS 304 Contemporary Psychoanalytic Thought II This is the second of a two-part course covering the contemporary theoretical perspectives in today’s mainstream of psychoanalysis. The course provides an introduction and overview of the Self Psychological, Interpersonal, Intersubjective, Relational, and Constructivist approaches. These theories are discussed not only theoretically, but also in their clinical manifestations and spiritual implications
Prerequisite: PS 303, Contemporary Psychoanalytic Thought I
PS 306 Use of Dreams in Psychoanalysis II This second term of Dream Analysis focuses on post-Freudian and Jungian contributions to the analysis of dreams. Theory and technique are explored from different psychoanalytic perspectives. Topics include contemporary emphasis on the manifest content, the primary process, and the dream context. In addition, self-state dreams, the implications of REM dream research, and initial dreams will be studied. Clinical material is integrated with the theoretical readings.
Prerequisite: Use of Dreams in Psychoanalysis I, attainment of Phase III status in the training
Clinical Case Seminar (CCS g and h) These two semesters of CCS constitute two integrative seminars, Capstone I and Capstone II, taken during the final year of Residency, during with the Integrative Paper is prepared and defended for graduation.
Prerequisite: Completion of CCS a thru f. Be in last year of Residency

The following courses are taken at various times throughout the curriculum:

CTC a thru h Clinical Training Conference This weekly community meeting, offered two terms per year, and required of all Psychoanalytic Residents each time offered, provides an opportunity for Residents to integrate elements of psychoanalysis around clinical applications and practice. Organized as clinical case presentations by guest analysts and discussions of issues of relevance to psychoanalytic clinical practice, Residents gain practice in issues such as diagnosis and appropriate mechanisms for treatment, organizing and presenting clinical case material, and ethical and legal issues regarding psychoanalytic clinical work.
SI a thru d: Spirituality Integration Courses These courses focus on spiritual intersectionality with psychoanalysis. Spirituality is broadly defined. Courses are taught by certified psychoanalysts with specific interest and expertise in areas of spiritual integration. Each instructor teaches their own area of expertise. Residents are required to take four of these courses by four different instructors during their training. Recent offerings include: Faith, Values, and the Psychology of Religious Experience; Psychoanalysis and Spirituality: Practice and Belief
Prerequisites as determined by each instructor
Elective courses -Two required The content of these two required elective courses will vary from year to year and will be constructed upon the needs and wishes of current Residents, along with the availability of appropriate faculty and the skills and talents they bring to Blanton-Peale. Courses will tend to expand on curriculum content for more in-depth exploration of psychoanalysis or expanding into as-yet unexplored areas. Recent offerings include: We Refugees: Jewish émigré psychoanalysts and the great wave of European intellectual immigration in the 1930s to the United States; Continuous Case Seminar.
Prerequisites as determined by each instructor